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Pauline Lewis



Contact Information

Email    plucylew@ucla.edu
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Pauline is a PhD candidate in the Modern Middle Eastern field, specializing in the history of transnational technology and technical expertise in Ottoman and post-Ottoman societies. Her dissertation, "A Sociotechnical History of the Telegraph in the Modern Ottoman Empire, 1855-1908," explores the connection between telegraphy and the emergence of new practices and discourses in the empire, specifically the concepts of territorial sovereignty and technocratic authority, alternative understandings of space and time, and the entanglement of private capital and public infrastructure. For this project, she drew on a range of sources in Ottoman Turkish, Arabic, and French, including documents from the Ottoman state archives; biographies of Ottoman telegraphers; literary, musical, and visual texts; records from British telegraph companies; and maps and circulars from the International Telegraph Union.

Her research has been supported by the American Research Institute in Turkey (ARIT), the U.S. Fulbright Student Program, the Turkish FLAS Fellowship, and the UCLA International Institute. From 2016-2017, she was a visiting fellow at the History of Science Department at Harvard University. Pauline received her Bachelors in History and Arabic Studies from the University of Michigan, where her honors thesis on the post-colonial feminism of an Egyptian Islamist activist received high honors.

Fields of Study

Modern Middle East

Research

Pauline is a PhD candidate in the Modern Middle Eastern field, specializing in the history of transnational technology and technical expertise in Ottoman and post-Ottoman societies. Her dissertation, "A Sociotechnical History of the Telegraph in the Modern Ottoman Empire, 1855-1908," explores the connection between telegraphy and the emergence of new practices and discourses in the empire, specifically the concepts of territorial sovereignty and technocratic authority, alternative understandings of space and time, and the entanglement of private capital and public infrastructure. For this project, she drew on a range of sources in Ottoman Turkish, Arabic, and French, including documents from the Ottoman state archives; biographies of Ottoman telegraphers; literary, musical, and visual texts; records from British telegraph companies; and maps and circulars from the International Telegraph Union. Research: Ottoman Empire; History of Technology; Modern Middle East

Grants and Awards

Visiting Fellow, History of Science Department, Harvard University 2016-2017
ARIT Research Fellowship, 2015-2016
UCLA International Institute, Fieldwork Fellowship, 2014
FLAS Turkish Fellowship, 2011-2012
U.S. Fulbright Student Program, Egypt, 2007-2008

Advisors

James Gelvin, Sarah Abrevaya Stein, M. Norton Wise, John Agnew

Degrees

B.A. in History and Arabic Studies, University of Michigan
M.A. in History, University of California, Los Angeles