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Winter 2020 Graduate Courses

*Course Offerings and Dates/ Times are tentative. Please check the schedule of class on October 28 for the finalized listings.

Course No. & Name Professor/Lecturer Day/Time Course Description
HIST 200J (B) - Historiography of the Modern Middle East James Gelvin W 2-4:50 This course examines the methods that historians have used since the 1970s to understand the history of the modern Middle East, along with particularly contentious topics. Among the methods and topics considered: Orientalism, the study of religion, social history, cultural history, intellectual history, class, world systems theory, gender, political economy, nationalism, the colonial encounter and the influence of Weber, Marx, Gramsci, Hobsbawm, E.P. Thompson, and others.
HIST 200J - Islamic Historiography Michael Morony W 8-10 This course will examine the origins and development of Islamic historical concepts and compositions. It will also examine the way modern Western and Middle Eastern authors have reated the history of Islamic western Asia.
HIST C200M – Post War Japanese History/ Film William Marotti T 4-6:50 Meant to supplement 173D (Postwar Japanese History Through Film) as a graduate seminar based on augmented readings in history and theory, deeper explorations of the 173D films and course assignments, and weekly written responses. Students are welcome and are encouraged to sit in on 173D as well. The course can also be used to begin building readings for a postwar history field exam.
HIST 201D- Topics in History: Early Modern Europe Milos Jovanovic W 9-11:50am Seminar, three hours. Graduate course involving reading, lecturing, and discussion of selected topics. May be repeated for credit. When concurrently scheduled with course 191, undergraduates must obtain consent of instructor to enroll. S/U or letter grading.
HIST C201H - Topics in US History Peter Hudson T 10-12:50 This seminar will consider current scholarship on the history and theory of US imperialism and anti-imperialism. While we will focus largely on the manifestations of US imperialism in twentieth century Africa and the Caribbean, students should consider the texts as templates whose approaches can be applied to other regions, including Asia and Latin America. Readings are interdisciplinary in approach and will often move beyond the US historical field into geography, political economy, political theory, legal studies, cultural studies, gender studies, and Black Studies.
HIST C201H - Topics in History: U.S. Eric Avila M 2-4:50 Seminar, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Reading and discussion of selected topics. May be repeated for credit. May be concurrently scheduled with course C191D. S/U or letter grading.
HIST 201I- Advanced Historiography: Latin America Kevin Terraciano R 11-1:50 Seminar, three hours. Graduate course involving reading, lecturing, and discussion of selected topics. May be repeated for credit. When concurrently scheduled with course 191, undergraduates must obtain consent of instructor to enroll. S/U or letter grading.
201L - Advanced Historiography: China Richard Von Glahn W 2-4:50 Seminar, three hours. Graduate course involving reading, lecturing, and discussion of selected topics. May be repeated for credit. When concurrently scheduled with course 191, undergraduates must obtain consent of instructor to enroll. S/U or letter grading.
201O - Medicine and the Human Sciences since 1800 Ted Porter W 3-5:50 The label human sciences, less familiar in English than in French, is a larger category than social science. Indeed, anyone in touch with recent developments in history of science will find it hard to exclude sciences of nature and technology—this because of the centrality for science of social practices, both material and cognitive, and the often tight connections of natural science to social or political goals that are not confined by the (typically fuzzy) boundaries of discipline. We will treat “human science” as a point of view rather than a clearly-articulated subject matter, focusing as much on medical and environmental sciences as on social, economic, and cultural ones.
213B - History of Women, Men, Sexuality Katherine Marino R 2-4:50 Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 213A. Research, analysis, drafting, and rewriting of student final papers. S/U or letter grading.
246B- Introduction to U.S. History: 1790 to 1900 Stephen Aron W 2-4:50 Seminar, three hours. Graduate survey of significant literature dealing with U.S. history from the Colonial period to the present. Each course may be taken independently for credit.
282A - Seminar: Chinese History Bin Wong T 1-3:50 Seminar, three hours. Course 282A is requisite to 282B. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 282B).